Tag Archives: blog

What I’ve Been Up To

It’s been a while since I updated, so let me dump some Eddy News(tm) on you!

Free Stuff

  • Heel Heat,” a short story I wrote for Fate Codex, has been incorporated into the Fate SRD, which means you can now read it for free! It’s a story about the intersection of professional wrestling and drug abuse, so if you’re into gritty crime drama, you may enjoy this!
  • I’ve started a new podcast! Along with Matthew Dawkins and Dixie Cochran, I’m a host for the Onyx Pathcast. We talk about all sorts of things related to both Onyx Path games and general topics of working as a freelancer in the game industry, and we also have on a wide variety of guests. Check it out every Friday at noon EST!

Promotional Stuff

  • In case you haven’t noticed, I’ve moved all the Pugmire-specific content to a separate website. Now you can find all your Pugmire goodies at realmsofpugmire.com!
  • We recently released Pan’s Guide for New Pioneers, a Pugmire adventure and tutorial to the game system. And we’re getting great reviews! Here’s one from Reviews from R’lyeah.
  • I’ve been increasing my disability advocacy over the past year or so. Recently I was interviewed by Bitch Media, and they included a link to my presentation at ECGC in 2017.

Travel Stuff

  • I’ll be at Gen Con again this year, representing Onyx Path and Pugsteady. I’ll be there to talk about PugmireMonarchies of Mau, the new Pugmire card game Fetch Quest, and the upcoming Dystopia Rising tabletop game. I’ll be running demos at our booth (#501), so stop on by!
  • In September I’ll be at the Broadleaf Writer’s Conference, spreading my tips and tricks for working in interactive media. It’s a great conference, and everyone learns a ton from it!
  • And in October I’ll be at Save Against Fear, the Bodhana Group’s gaming convention celebrating therapeutic use of games! I’ll be running two Pugmire games and sitting on a panel about game design, so it should be a lot of fun!

Personal Stuff

As I’ve mentioned before, I moved back from Ireland in December of last year. There were a lot of reasons, but they ultimately boil down to us not being able to make it work financially. Ireland is a lovely country, and I hope I can go back and visit someday, but living there just wasn’t in the cards as I had hoped.

So now I’m back in the Atlanta area (Alpharetta specifically) and settling back in. My long-term contract with Onyx Path Publishing is still going well, and I’ve picked up some additional work from companies such as Next Games, MetaArcade, and CRC Press (as well as some I can’t announce yet!) Pugsteady still trundles on as a going concern.

To be honest, it’s a bit of a scary time to be a creative professional, particularly in the United States. Healthcare cuts make it harder to get medical attention, and putting anything remotely controversial online can get you targeted by a hate mob, let go from a contract, or even fired. As I increase my visibility as a disabled person, I risk being ostracized by people who don’t think I’m “good enough” as abled-bodied folks.

But I have a lot of supportive friends and peers, and I’ve had a lot of luck finding great and supportive clients to work for. I have fans who sincerely appreciate the projects I work on, and they’re happy to spread the word to other people who might appreciate them. For every rough day where I wonder why I do this, I get a nice “thank you” in my Facebook or a kind email gushing over something I worked on. And that helps. It helps to know that there are people who appreciate what I do. If you’re reading this, odds are you’re one of those people. So I’ll keep doing it, for you. Thank you for being there!

The Death of Long-Form Blogging

In a recent Skype call with Justin Achilli, he mentioned that long-form blogging (for him, at least) has been ruined by microblogging like Facebook and Twitter. And it really got me thinking, to the point that I actually looked into ways to feed my Facebook or G+ feed into this blog.

I have my Twitter set up to feed into my Facebook, and I usually copy/paste into G+ as well. I will update on those sites a few times a day, and sometimes I’ll get into fairly elaborate thoughts on the non-Twitter sites (Twitter just doesn’t suit lengthy discussion well). And yet by the time I get my head around a topic to go into with this blog, a dozen other paying assignments come up, and I end up devoting my time to those. Although I find the argument of “If I wrote as many words here as I did on social media I would have more to show for it” false (since casual conversation is much less strenuous than essay writing), Justin’s comment has made me think about what I use blogging for, and why.

I started blogging waaaaaaay back when LiveJournal was a thing. I did it originally as just an online journal/diary, and from there it became my main social media site. A few years ago, I started using it as a place to pour out my thoughts, and soon after I made the switch to this site, which was a better place for that format. I had opinions! I had ideas! And I had a place to write them down and share them.

As social media sites have gotten more mature and integrated, I’m finding that I’m less interested in essaying and more interested in conversation. I find the back and forth to be interesting (when people aren’t being unintentional or explicit jerks, of course). The shorter, more ephemeral component is also more interesting — it feels like a moment, an experience. The blog as a format now feels more serious, more of a commitment.

Is that bad? I don’t think so, but I don’t know where that serious, detailed experience fits into my online presence just now. I feel like this site needs more focus instead of what I’ve done for the past several years of “post shit I find interesting,” and yet a tighter focus reduces my ability to contribute to the blog even further. I don’t think I should stop blogging — there’s still a lot of value here, even if I don’t use it often — but it does have me thinking about how the blog has evolved, and how it fits into not only my own life, but social media as a whole.

How do you view blogs these days?

Why eddyfate.com?

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Now that I’ve made the jump over to a spiffy new WordPress installation, I have a ton of blog ideas that have been backing up on me. However, the first and most logical one to tackle is: Why eddyfate.com? That question has three different facets, which I’ll answer in turn.

Why A Blog?

I’ve been blogging in some form or fashion for about a decade now (back when I started on opendiary). I like blogging. I’ve been asked before why I like posting my thoughts online. Admittedly, I got asked that a lot more before the rise of Facebook and Twitter, but I still don’t have a really good answer for it. I think a lot of it is that I have a lot of very specialized interests, and blogging allows me to share those interests with an audience that might appreciate them. I’ve developed a solid group of friends and peers that can talk intelligently about those interests, but I never really lost the habit of blogging. Plus, it’s a good excuse to write.

Continue reading Why eddyfate.com?

Welcome to the new digs

WordPress
Image via Wikipedia

I’ve been meaning to move my blog off of LiveJournal and onto WordPress for some time now. Thanks to David, my roommate and ever-patient webmaster, I went ahead and made the plunge. I’m still toying with it, but I’ve imported the last several months of posts from my LiveJournal to keep you busy while I’m getting things sorted.

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